login bonus fun88?logo_login bonus full screen mode for bet365 chrome_free login mr green tagliaferro https://www.google.com//1b1 World Federalist Movement - Canada Fri, 25 Jan 2019 15:00:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.3 /1b1/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/cropped-smaller-header-32x32.jpg TakeAction – Building a world community https://www.google.com//1b1 32 32 TakeAction for November 2018: The International Criminal Court needs Canada’s support https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/11/takeaction-november-2018-international-criminal-court-needs-canadas-support/ /1b1/2018/11/takeaction-november-2018-international-criminal-court-needs-canadas-support/#respond Thu, 08 Nov 2018 18:55:26 +0000 /1b1/?p=2336 The 17th session of the annual meeting of the Assembly of States Parties (ASP) to the Rome Statute will be held December 5 – 12, 2018 in The Hague. The provisional work plan and background documentation is available on the?website of the ASP. Ahead of the ASP meeting, WFMC has once again partnered with officials […]

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The 17th session of the annual meeting of the Assembly of States Parties (ASP) to the Rome Statute will be held December 5 – 12, 2018 in The Hague.

The provisional work plan and background documentation is available on the?website of the ASP.

Ahead of the ASP meeting, WFMC has once again partnered with officials at Global Affairs Canada to organize a meeting among Canadian civil society representatives and members of the Canadian delegation to the ASP to be held in mid-November.

Some highly charged discussions are anticipated at this year*s ASP. The agenda includes an item on ※Addressing the threats directed at the International Criminal Court, its Judges and States Parties cooperating with the Court§ following the?controversial speech?attacking the court by U.S. National Security Advisor (and long-time foe of the ICC) John Bolton.

Other issues of concern include the challenges posed by some members of the African Union, specific cases including Myanmar and Venezuela, issues around gender justice and what progress the Court is making concerning the crime of aggression.

Another pending issue is the upcoming search for a new Prosecutor. The term of current Prosecutor Bensouda will end in 2021 and the search for a new Prosecutor will, ideally, build and expand on best practices around transparency. The Coalition for the ICC is calling for the inclusion of independent experts.

At?last year’s ASP meeting,?a historic, consensus decision was made to ※activate§ the ICC*s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression. Canada has yet to ratify the Kampala Amendments.


Background resources

Latest news and articles from WFMC

Coalition for the International Criminal Court

Webinar: The 20th Anniversary of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court

A discussion held in July 2018 and hosted by WFMC Executive Director Fergus Watt. The webinar considered the Court*s first twenty years, its current state, and the challenges that lay ahead over the course of a discussion with Valerie Oosterveld, Associate Professor at Western University*s Faculty of Law,?and Bill Pace, Convenor of the Coalition for an International Criminal Court.


What you can do

Ask Minister Freeland to increase Canadian support for the International Criminal Court.

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TakeAction for October 2018: An expanded leadership role for Canada at the United Nations https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/10/takeaction-october-2018-expanded-leadership-role-canada-united-nations/ /1b1/2018/10/takeaction-october-2018-expanded-leadership-role-canada-united-nations/#respond Thu, 11 Oct 2018 17:26:37 +0000 /1b1/?p=2255 In March 2016 Prime Minister Trudeau announced Canada’s intention to seek election to a two-year term (2021-22) on the United Nations Security Council. Canada is in a three-way race, competing against Norway and Ireland for two seats assigned to the Western European and Other Group of States (WEOG). The Security Council is the United Nations’ […]

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In March 2016 Prime Minister Trudeau announced Canada’s intention to seek election to a two-year term (2021-22) on the United Nations Security Council. Canada is in a three-way race, competing against Norway and Ireland for two seats assigned to the Western European and Other Group of States (WEOG).

The Security Council is the United Nations’ most powerful?body, with “primary responsibility?for the maintenance of international peace and security.” Five powerful countries (China, France, Russia, United Kingdom, United States) sit as “permanent members” along with ten elected members with?two-year terms. Since 1990, the Council has dramatically increased its activity and it now meets in nearly continuous session. It dispatches military operations, imposes sanctions, mandates arms inspections,?deploys election monitors?and more.

When others assess a country’s candidacy for election to the UN Security Council, their decisions are based in large part on that country’s contribution to the UN’s goals and purposes.

Norway and Ireland are two states that make significant and consistent contributions to the work of the UN. But an examination of Canadian contributions to maintaining peace and security and to reducing poverty indicate that this country’s record leaves a lot to be desired.

1) Keeping the peace.

Maintaining international peace and security is the UN’s primary purpose. But Canada’s contributions to peacekeeping have been late, and disappointingly well below what has been promised. In August 2016?Canada announced?a commitment of up to 600 military personnel, 150 police and $450 million over three years. That commitment was reiterated last November by the Prime Minister in remarks at the Vancouver Ministerial Meeting on UN Peacekeeping. The Prime Minister went on to?announce?that Canada would make available tactical airlift support, an Aviation Task Force, a Quick Reaction Force and new deployments of police.

In March 2018 Canada announced that it would deploy up to 250 personnel to Mali, well below the 600
military personnel and 150 police promised for UN operations in August 2016. Meanwhile the Canadian ※Quick Reaction Force§ and deployments of additional police peacekeepers are nowhere to be seen.

2) Sustainable Development.

In September 2018 a report by the Paris-based Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) warned that the Trudeau government’s record on foreign aid spending is weaker than that of the Harper administration.

Mr. Trudeau*s latest promise of an extra $2-billion for foreign aid over the next five years will fail to restore Ottawa*s aid spending to where it was in 2012. Canada*s official development aid has declined to 0.26 per cent of gross national income, compared with 0.31 per cent in 2012 under the Harper government.

To coincide with the General Debate of the 73rd session of the General Assembly at the end of September, the World Federalist Movement – Canada has published the latest volume in the United Nations and Canada project,?What Canada Could and Should Do at the United Nations 2018: A Question of Leadership. The publication addresses the government’s plan for pursuing a non-permanent seat on the Security Council in 2021, investigating various areas in which Canada can display international leadership.

The publication begins with an open letter addressed to?Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland? from WFMC Board Chair John Trent, who is also the editor of the UN and Canada series.

In the letter, Trent writes, “… the world is in economic, social and political turmoil that is putting pressure on international organizations. It requires countries like Canada to mobilize coalitions of actors and civil society to renew the international system. The objective of this booklet is to encourage your Government to return to your two goals of reengagement and leadership on the world stage before it is too late.

With regard to reengagement with the United Nations, the Liberals said Canada would enhance its participation in peacekeeping, welcome refugees and immigrants, combat global warming, increase aid to the poorest in developing countries, protect women and children in conflict, furnish humanitarian aid following natural catastrophes, change the approach to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, promote human rights and rebuild bridges with the international community.

There is also the question of UN renewal to achieve these ends. Your speeches on diversity, optimism, openness and tolerance were applauded around the world. But clearly we must move beyond words to greater action.”

The?What Canada Could and Should Do at the United Nations 2018: A Question of Leadership?publication is available for free download. Paper copies can be ordered for $15 through the?free casino bonusUnited Nations and Canada website, where you can also find the articles posted individually and listen to some of the authors talk about their articles.

What you can do

Write to Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and ask her how Canada will demonstrate our contribution to the UN’s goals and purposes, given such issues as Canada’s promised but slow and lower than promised contributions to UN peacekeeping and the recent strong criticism by the OECD of our Overseas Development Assistance funding levels.

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Take Action: John Bolton and the International Criminal Court https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/09/take-action-john-bolton-international-criminal-court/ /1b1/2018/09/take-action-john-bolton-international-criminal-court/#respond Thu, 27 Sep 2018 16:57:39 +0000 /1b1/?p=2249 On September 10th, United States National Security Advisor John Bolton gave a speech to the Federalist Society in which he spoke, at length and with numerous inaccuracies, about the International Criminal Court. You can watch the speech?or?read the full text. Bolton began his speech talking about the establishment of the International Criminal Court being the […]

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On September 10th, United States National Security Advisor John Bolton gave a speech to the Federalist Society in which he spoke, at length and with numerous inaccuracies, about the International Criminal Court.

You can watch the speech?or?read the full text.

Bolton began his speech talking about the establishment of the International Criminal Court being the result of “years of effort by self-styled ‘global governance’ advocates” and that “the largely unspoken, but always central, aim of its most vigorous supporters was to constrain the United States” and that “the ICC was created as a free-wheeling global organization claiming jurisdiction over individuals without their consent.” Of course, these statements are incorrect.

His misleading, and often false statements continued, including characterizing the preliminary investigation into the situation in Afghanistan as being targeted at US service members and intelligence professionals. ICC investigations consider the entire situation in a geographic area and all the actors involved. In the case of Afghanistan, the Taliban is a large part of the situation being investigated.

Bolton cited five principal concerns about the Court, including that it threatens US sovereignty and is contrary to the fundamental American principle of the separation of powers; that the crimes the Court has jurisdiction over have ambiguous definitions; that it has not sufficiently deterred and punished crimes; that is is superfluous because the US judicial system holds American citizens to the “highest legal and ethical standards”; and lastly, that others have criticized or rejected the ICC’s authority.

Clearly, there are a lot of red flags in Bolton’s comments and his efforts to explain himself do not lessen them.

Bolton has been severely critical of the Court in the past, when he was the US Ambassador to the United Nations during the presidency of George W Bush, but this attack on the Court is more menacing and, as National Security Advisor he has more political authority now (and fewer in positions of authority who might restrain him) than was the case in the early 2000s when he was UN Ambassador.

He says that he believes “that perpetrators should face legitimate, effective, and accountable prosecution for their crimes, by sovereign national governments” which, of course, often does not happen and is a central reason for the Court’s existence.

Bolton concluded by threatening to sanction ICC funds, ban the ICC’s judges and prosecutors from entering the US, and prosecute them in the US criminal system. The same would hold for “any corporation or state” that assists an ICC investigation involving US citizens [which presumably includes the World Federalist Movement, which hosts the global Coalition for the ICC].

The response to Bolton has been swift and broad, although Canada has yet to release a statement.

Responses to John Bolton’s remarks

free casino bonusThe International Criminal Court

Statement by the President of the Assembly of States Parties, O-Gon Kwon, reaffirming support for the ICC

Country responses to Bolton, including Germany, France, and Sweden (Twitter summary)

International Bar Association

Ambassador (ret) David Scheffer on John Bolton*s Announcement of ※Ugly and Dangerous§ Punitive Actions against Judges, Prosecutors of Int*l Criminal Court

Judge Theodor Meron, President of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals

With all the world*s crises, this is John Bolton*s top concern??(Editorial board of the Washington Post)

Four States That Have Stayed Quiet Over Bolton*s ICC Speech (David Bosco, Lawfare)


What you can do

Write to Foreign Affairs Minister Chyrstia Freeland and ask her to publicly affirm Canadian support for the International Criminal Court.

 

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TakeAction for July 2018: Building international justice https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/07/takeaction-july-2018-building-international-justice/ /1b1/2018/07/takeaction-july-2018-building-international-justice/#respond Thu, 19 Jul 2018 15:02:36 +0000 /1b1/?p=2138 July 17th, the Day of International Criminal Justice, marks the 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute, the founding treaty of the International Criminal Court. One way for Canada to mark this 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute would be to ratify the Kampala Amendments on the crime of aggression. Negotiations in December 2017 in New […]

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July 17th, the Day of International Criminal Justice, marks the 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute, the founding treaty of the International Criminal Court.

One way for Canada to mark this 20th anniversary of the Rome Statute would be to ratify the Kampala Amendments on the crime of aggression. Negotiations in December 2017 in New York at the meeting of the International Criminal Court*s Assembly of States Parties led to a historic, consensus decision to activate the ICC*s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression.

Now that the aggression amendments have been agreed and incorporated, it would be reasonable to expect Canada to ratify the Kampala amendments.

Over the years?Canada has been one of the key middle power champions of an effective International Criminal Court. Canada led a group of like-minded states during the negotiation of the Rome Statute (the Court*s founding treaty) and was among the first to incorporate the domestic changes necessary to come into compliance with the treaty, using legislation that became a model for many other countries around the world.

Canada*s can extend this country*s historic support for the ICC and demonstrate its support for including the crime of aggression as one of the ICC*s four core crimes by ratifying the Kampala amendments.

Resources

The?Coalition for the International Criminal Court?has gathered a variety of materials to mark the 20th anniversary, including a toolkit, a list of planned events, and links to video and statements.

As well, the website of the International Criminal Court has materials about the 20th anniversary including documentation from an Open Forum that was held in The Hague, The Netherlands earlier this year. The event was attended by over 280 people, including members of?civil society, ICC officials, and representatives of states and regional and international organizations.?Links to video of the event, as well as photographs and the prepared written remarks from various participants?can be found on the ICC*s website.

What you can do

1) Join us on July 19th, 2018 at 12pm ET for a webinar to mark the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The webinar will consider the Court*s first twenty years, its current state, and the challenges that lay ahead over the course of a discussion with Valerie Oosterveld and Bill Pace.?Learn more and register on our website.

2)? Write to Foreign Minister Freeland encouraging?Canada to ratify the Kampala amendments to the Rome Statute thereby allowing Canada to come within the ICC*s jurisdiction over the crime of aggression and support an open and transparent selection process for Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda’s successor?.?A sample email is available here.

3)?Download and read the CICC’s Toolkit?for the 20th anniversary and decide?what else you can do.

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TakeAction for June 2018: Canada*s priorities to advance the Responsibility to Protect https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/06/takeaction-june-2018-canadas-priorities-advance-responsibility-protect/ /1b1/2018/06/takeaction-june-2018-canadas-priorities-advance-responsibility-protect/#respond Tue, 26 Jun 2018 18:38:57 +0000 /1b1/?p=2080 On June 25 the United Nations General Assembly will hold its 2018 debate on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). Unlike in previous years, when the UN GA convened an ※interactive dialogue§ (a series of statements by member states and experts), this year*s debate will lead to a resolution on the Responsibility to Protect. This may […]

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On June 25 the United Nations General Assembly will hold its 2018 debate on the Responsibility to Protect (R2P). Unlike in previous years, when the UN GA convened an ※interactive dialogue§ (a series of statements by member states and experts), this year*s debate will lead to a resolution on the Responsibility to Protect.

This may seem unremarkable, but in today*s arcane, ungoverned international legal order the adoption of a UN GA resolution marks an important step 每 an indication of wider acceptance of the R2P normative framework by the international community.

The World Federalists have supported the progressive development of the Responsibility to Protect since it was first proposed by a Canada-sponsored international commission in 2001. Governments adopted the R2P principle in the UN Reform World Summit Outcome Document of 2005. According to this doctrine,

1. The State has the primary responsibility for the protection of populations within its territory from atrocity crimes such as genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing.
2. The international community has a responsibility to assist States in fulfilling this responsibility.
3. The international community should use appropriate diplomatic, humanitarian and other peaceful means to protect populations from these crimes. And if a State fails to protect its populations or is in fact the perpetrator of crimes, the international community must be prepared to take stronger measures, including the collective use of force through the UN Security Council.

The present government has sought to restore Canadian support for R2P. Importantly, Canada has identified an R2P ※focal point,§ joining 60 other governments that have similarly earmarked a staff capacity within government tasked with overseeing R2P implementation and norm development.

However, as with so many international issues this government prioritizes, the rhetoric and promises exceed the reality of actual Government of Canada measures to implement.

In the R2P context,?the recent report by Bob Rae, Special Envoy to Myanmar?was disappointing. Rae, and the Government of Canada announcements in response to his report, simply failed to address the atrocities committed in Myanmar as an R2P issue, to assess the humanitarian disaster through an ※R2P lens.§ In particular Rae, and Canada, failed to conclude that there was ※state responsibility§ for the massive displacement of over 700,000 Rohingya.

Rae*s report, and Canada*s response, focused primarily on the need to increase humanitarian assistance to those already displaced and living in neighbouring Bangladesh.

It simply defies common sense to suggest that such a large campaign of ethnic cleansing could be carried out without the apparatus of the state military and other agencies. But acknowledging the responsibility of the state of Myanmar for these crimes would have led to calls to take additional action against Myanmar, such as economic sanctions. It was a program of sanctions that years ago led to the initial steps toward that country*s democratization. Clearly Canada didn*t want to go there at this time.

And so, when a government so clearly ※talks the talk§ but doesn*t ※walk the walk,§ one is left wondering just what if anything Canada does see as its priorities for advancing the Responsibility to Protect.

Let*s ask!

What you can do

Write to Foreign Minister Freeland.?A sample letter is provided here. If you can, send a copy to your MP (you can find your MP’s contact information here).

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TakeAction: Building the Responsibility to Protect https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/05/takeaction-building-responsibility-protect/ /1b1/2018/05/takeaction-building-responsibility-protect/#respond Fri, 25 May 2018 13:22:30 +0000 /1b1/?p=2001 Whither Canadian diplomacy in support of the Rohingya In what has become one of the worst ongoing atrocities of our times, approximately 700,000 members of the Rohingya? minority have been forced since last August to flee northern Rakhine State in Myanmar to neighbouring Bangladesh, where they are struggling to survive. According to a?March 2018 report […]

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Whither Canadian diplomacy in support of the Rohingya

In what has become one of the worst ongoing atrocities of our times, approximately 700,000 members of the Rohingya? minority have been forced since last August to flee northern Rakhine State in Myanmar to neighbouring Bangladesh, where they are struggling to survive.

According to a?March 2018 report by Andrew Gilmour, UN Assistant Secretary-General for Human Rights, the ethnic cleansing campaign by Myanmar’s security forces against Rohingya Muslims continues.

The World Federalists have supported the progressive development of the Responsibility to Protect normative framework and the implementation of R2P principles. According to this doctrine,

1) The State has the primary responsibility for the protection of populations within its territory from atrocity crimes such as genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing.

2) The international community has a responsibility to assist States in fulfilling this responsibility.

3) The international community should use appropriate diplomatic, humanitarian and other peaceful means to protect populations from these crimes. And if a State fails to protect its populations or is in fact the perpetrator of crimes, the international community must be prepared to take stronger measures, including the collective use of force through the UN Security Council.

The application of R2P has sometimes generated controversy and criticism, for example in Libya when a civilian protection mandate was interpreted by western governments as a mandate for regime change, or through the failure by the Security Council to protect civilians in conflict (e.g. Syria, South Sudan). However, misapplication or failed application of the R2P norms should not diminish the utility and necessity of the R2P doctrine itself.

Meaningful action by the UN Security Council will be difficult due to the opposition of China and Russia, permanent members whose veto powers can block Security Council decisions. Nevertheless, the R2P framework is an essential lens for assessing what needs to be done in response to the Rohingya crisis.

Canada has been an outspoken critic of the Myanmar government*s treatment of the Rohingya. In April, Canada*s Special Envoy to Myanmar, Hon. Bob Rae, released his report on the situation entitled,?※Tell Them We*re Human.§?The Rae report made a number of recommendations for Canadian action, notably calling on Canada to step up its response to the Rohingya crisis by investing more than half a billion 每 $150-million annually over the next four years 每 on humanitarian and development efforts in Myanmar and Bangladesh. (A Global Affairs press release at the time of the Rae report indicates that Canada*s humanitarian assistance since the beginning of 2017 stands at $45.9 million.)

In May, Canada*s Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland travelled to Rohingya refugee camps in Bangladesh. She indicated that Canada would be a leader in the international response to the crisis, but declined to support the kind of humanitarian response called for in the Rae report.

The Rae report did not invoke a strong R2P perspective in its assessment of what should be done on behalf of the Rohingya. Consequently it neglected to discuss the failure of the state of Myanmar to protect the Rohingya, when a finding of ※state responsibility§ would trigger international legal obligations under international humanitarian law and the UN Charter. And it failed to support imposing a robust program of sanctions on Myanmar.
What you can do

Write to Minister Freeland to ask what, exactly Canada*will do in response to the Rohingya crisis.?A sample letter is provided.

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TakeAction: Building Peackeeeping https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/05/takeaction-building-peackeeeping/ /1b1/2018/05/takeaction-building-peackeeeping/#respond Thu, 17 May 2018 13:26:22 +0000 /1b1/?p=2003 May 29 is the International Day of UN Peacekeepers:?Is Canada “back” or not? As we mark the?International Day of UN Peacekeepers on May 29th, World Federalists continue to campaign for Canada to do more for UN Peacekeeping. Recently, WFMC President?Walter Dorn gave testimony?to a House of Commons committee studying peacekeeping. While WFMC welcomes the announcement […]

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May 29 is the International Day of UN Peacekeepers:?Is Canada “back” or not?

As we mark the?International Day of UN Peacekeepers on May 29th, World Federalists continue to campaign for Canada to do more for UN Peacekeeping. Recently, WFMC President?Walter Dorn gave testimony?to a House of Commons committee studying peacekeeping.

While WFMC welcomes the announcement made in March by Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and National Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan of?※a commitment to deploy an Aviation Task Force to the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA) for a period of 12 months,”?a number of questions remain, including whether this truly marks a return by Canada to UN peacekeeping for the long term, or whether it is a brief?single commitment.

Media stories?have raised other issues as well, including:

1) Duration. Some media reports indicate that the Canadian deployment is only for one year.

2) Mandate. Media reports have said that Canadian helicopters and support personnel will be tasked to operate as part of MINUSMA, but also as part of the French-led Operation Barkhane counter-terrorism operation and the newly created regional G5 Sahel (Burkina Faso, Chad,?Mali, Mauritania, and?Niger) regional force.

3) Training. The Canadian Forces have contributed very low levels of personnel to UN peace operations for a very long time and it is uncertain what steps are being taken to train Canadian military personnel for participation in future United Nations peacekeeping missions.

What you can do

Write to Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan, express your support for Canada’s participation in MINUSMA, and ask him for further details on the duration and mandate of Canada’s deployment, as well as the concerns regarding the training of Canadian Forces personnel in peacekeeping.

Follow our Canadians for Peacekeeping project, which tracks the status of the Canadian government’s promises and pledges using easily measurable statistics and benchmark data on its?website?and on?Facebook.

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TakeAction for April 2018 https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/04/takeaction-april-2018/ /1b1/2018/04/takeaction-april-2018/#respond Thu, 12 Apr 2018 17:45:33 +0000 /1b1/?p=1955 World Federalists support the application of the principles of federalism to world affairs, in order that global governance becomes more equitable, just and democratically accountable. You can help! This month’s Take Action alerts provide suggestions for ways you can support: Canada’s participation in UN peacekeeping WFMC by renewing your membership or becoming a member for […]

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World Federalists support the application of the principles of federalism to world affairs, in order that global governance becomes more equitable, just and democratically accountable.

You can help!

This month’s Take Action alerts provide suggestions for ways you can support:

  • Canada’s participation in UN peacekeeping
  • WFMC by renewing your membership or becoming a member for the first time

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TakeAction for February 2018: Canadian diplomacy in support of the Rohingya https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/02/takeaction-february-2018-canadian-diplomacy-support-rohingya/ /1b1/2018/02/takeaction-february-2018-canadian-diplomacy-support-rohingya/#respond Wed, 14 Feb 2018 14:01:41 +0000 /1b1/?p=1871 The World Federalists have supported the progressive development of the Responsibility to Protect normative framework and the implementation of R2P principles. As such, we are grateful that Canada identified a Special Envoy to Myanmar and has recently increased by $12 million the assistance provided to address the humanitarian and security crisis in that country. Clearly […]

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The World Federalists have supported the progressive development of the Responsibility to Protect normative framework and the implementation of R2P principles. As such, we are grateful that Canada identified a Special Envoy to Myanmar and has recently increased by $12 million the assistance provided to address the humanitarian and security crisis in that country.

Clearly there is a need for member states at the United Nations to do more. Current actions, such as the resolution that emerged from the UN*s Third Committee this fall, do little more than condemn the violations of international law.

A return by those forcibly displaced from Rakhine state will not happen unless the refugees have the assurance that it is safe to do so. A UN force in the area is needed to provide the Rohingya with the security they require. We believe Canada has the opportunity to show leadership by bringing such a proposal to the UN for approval.

The Security Council has not addressed the Rohingya crisis because China and Russia are opposed to the UN intervening into the internal affairs of a country. Nevertheless, effective measures by Canada could include the imposition of targeted sanctions with a view to pressuring Myanmar to stop the ethnic cleansing and to consent to the presence of a General Assembly-sanctioned international force on their soil, to ensure that the Rohingya have the necessary protection for their safe return. Additional discussion and diplomacy in the General Assembly, perhaps as a prelude to an Emergency Special Session could also contribute to the diplomatic effort to modify the policies and behaviour of the government of Myanmar.

What you can do

Write to Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland and Minister for International Development Marie-Claude Bibeau and ask them to consider sanctions and other R2P principles.

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TakeAction for February 2018: UN2020: Preparing the UN2020 Summit https://www.google.com//1b1/2018/02/takeaction-february-2018-un2020-preparing-un2020-summit/ /1b1/2018/02/takeaction-february-2018-un2020-preparing-un2020-summit/#respond Tue, 13 Feb 2018 14:20:24 +0000 /1b1/?p=1869 The 24th of October, 2020 will mark the 75th anniversary of the United Nations. This constitutes an opportunity 每 a chance for civil society to push for improved world governance. Beyond the anniversary itself, 2020 will be a juncture of several multi-year reviews of treaties and ※plus-five§ conferences on topics as varied as the Women, […]

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The 24th of October, 2020 will mark the 75th anniversary of the United Nations. This constitutes an opportunity 每 a chance for civil society to push for improved world governance.

Beyond the anniversary itself, 2020 will be a juncture of several multi-year reviews of treaties and ※plus-five§ conferences on topics as varied as the Women, Peace and Security Agenda; Climate Change and the Paris Accord; the Human Rights Treaty Bodies;? the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

A group of NGOs consisting of the World Federalist Movement, The Stimson Center, CIVICUS and The Workable World Trust has taken on the task of advocating for an inclusive and effective 2020 Summit. We are calling for a General Assembly-led, adequately prepared process that involves a range of stakeholders 每 including UN member states, UN officials, parliamentarians, civil society representatives and scholars.

Of paramount importance comes the idea of a ※people-centered§ UN – that the United Nations should better reflect the views of diverse stakeholders in its decision-making processes, not only the positions of Member States* executive branches. This is one reason why our small UN2020 coordination group has issued a Call to Action?to organizations and networks.

What you can do

You can help us spread the word about UN2020 and the Call to Action for organizations and networks by following on social media (Twitter and Facebook) and signing up for the mailing list.

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